The New [New] Corpse, Installation View, Sector 2337, 2014. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

The New [New] Corpse, Installation View, Sector 2337, 2014. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

The New [New] Corpse, Installation View, Sector 2337, 2014. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

The New [New] Corpse, Installation View. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz. Left to right: Carlos Martiel, “Break the Night,” 2014. Documentation of a 2014 performance at Art League Houston; photograph by Alex Barber, 16 x 24″; Heather Mekkelson, “Debris Field: dependent clause,” 2008. Steel, ceramic, tile, gypsum, board; Jason Lazarus, “Untitled, (Vienna, Austria)”, 2008. Photographic print, 35 x 27″.

The New [New] Corpse, Installation View, Sector 2337, 2014. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

Young Joon Kwak, “Aggregate Body (Book),” 2014. Edition of 50 + 2 Exhibition copies, 12 x 12 x 1/2″.

Benjamin L. Aman and Marion Auburtin, “Loop Island,” 2011. Ceramic and modified musical mechanism, dimensions variable. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

Rachel Niffenegger, “Slit Witch (Night) Gown with Insignia,” 2014. Steel epoxy, white witch costume, pig foot, acrylic, 70″ (h) x 26″ (diam).

Aay Preston-Myint, “Of Their Slaves and Of Their Marriages,” 2012. Wood, metal, plaster, plastic laminate, enamel, cake, food coloring, frosting, approx. 49″ (h) x 16″ (diam). Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

Shoshanna Weinberger, “Posthumous Pin-Ups,” 2014. 15 ink/collage drawings on paper; 11 x 10 ft. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

The New [New] Corpse

October 16, 2014 | Curatorial, Exhibitions

Featuring Benjamin L. Aman & Marion Auburtin, Joseph Grigely, Young Joon Kwak, Jason Lazarus, Carlos Martiel, Heather Mekkelson, Aay Preston-Myint, Rachel Niffenegger, Xaviera Simmons, Shane Ward, and Shoshanna Weinberger; with Jane Jerardi as Sector 2337 November Studio Resident.

For its inaugural exhibition, Sector 2337 presents The New [New] Corpse, a group show produced by The Green Lantern Press with thirteen artists whose work in photography, sculpture, performance, film, and drawing wrestles with representation to show how the figure appears fragmented, distorted, or emphatically absent. These artists exhume the human body to study the material networks by which it is comprised. Xaviera Simmons shows an appropriated photograph of migrants on a boat. French artists Benjamin L. Aman and Marion Auburtin present ceramic music boxes that turn like grotesque curiosities. Recent Whitney Biennial participant Joseph Grigely offers expired New York Times clippings with the figure frozen and silent listening or mid-song. Heather Mekkelson includes the material excerpts of human activity and Rachel Niffenegger’s painted fabric hangs loose, torn and painted like a dress. Shoshanna Weinberger and Young Joon Kwak each explore an estranged and modified body, while Jason Lazarus photographs a blurred chair, emphasizing the body’s absence. Throughout each of these portrayals, representation is skewed, and unfixed — as copies of images in flux, emerging in foreign mediums that themselves have material properties: metal, cake, photography, facsimile, dust. Carlos Martiel documents a performance where he lay on ice for as long as possible, until his body temperature lowered to numbness. Shane Ward’s sculpture is a deteriorated cast of a Roman artifact, and Aay Preston-Myint installs an edible homage to utopic ideals. Within this constellation of works, a postulate emerges: the human figure is no longer defined by stable boundaries, but is rather embedded in a network of fluctuating nonhuman parts. You can see more about the exhibition’s affiliated catalogue here.